Stormwater Projects

Recent and Ongoing Stormwater Projects

The stormwater projects below help control stormwater and are an important part of the City’s stormwater drainage system. Once completed, they will project people, properties, and the environment from a range of stormwater impacts, such as flooding, erosions, pollution, and groundwater depletion.​​

Stormwater projects that use low impact development (LID) technologies help extend the life of Brampton’s stormwater drainage system and also help protect and enhance the City’s Natural Heritage System. LID technologies provide valuable services, such as cleaning and cycling water, supporting biodiversity, and forming ecological linages between natural heritage features, like woodlands, wetlands, and valleys.​​​​​​​

Drinkwater Pond Remediation

Drinkwater Pond Remediation

​The City is initiating a remediation project at Drinkwater pond in the fall of 2022 to lower pond water levels and ensure all drainage systems are operational.

Stormwater Pond Cleanouts

Stormwater Pond Cleanouts

Stormwater pond maintenance is a vital part of the City's stormwater management maintenance programs. Every year stormwater pond inspections prioritize stormwater pond maintenance requirements. Stormwater pond cleanouts include the removal of the stored dirt, sand, and sediments to restore a pond’s storage capacity and improve the water quality leaving the pond. Cleanouts for Lennon Pond and Lewis Pond will be complete in 2022. An estimated 3,600 cubic metres of dirt, sand and sediment will be removed from these two ponds. A cleanout will begin this year at Bloore Pond​, Brampton’s largest stormwater pond. This pond currently stores around 15,000 cubic meters of dirt, sand, and sediment which is equivalent to 8 average-size stormwater ponds and could fill over 8,800 pickup truck cargo beds.
Haggert Avenue Swale

Haggert Avenue Swale

The City of Brampton, in partnership with Credit Valley Conservation, took an innovative approach to stormwater management by overhauling Haggert Avenue in the Fletchers Creek SNAP. A vegetated swale was installed as a portion of Haggert Avenue was resurfaced. Vegetated swales are sloped open channels that are planted with native plants, grasses, shrubs, and trees. When it rains or when the snow melts the stormwater flowing alo​ng this stretch of Haggert Avenue enters the swale through openings in the curb. The vegetated swale filters stormwater as it flows through the planted area and is absorbed into the ground. The Haggert Avenue vegetated swale helps protect the water, wildlife, and fish like the endangered Redside Dace in Fletcher's Creek.​​
Grella Tree Trench

Grella Tree Trench

Urban street trees are usually planted in wells with less space for roots and are often surrounded by hard surfaces that stop rain from watering the tree. The Grella stormwater tree trench on Remembrance Drive uses a different approach. Stormwater tree trenches are a form of low impact development that connects rows of trees through a built underground system that controls, treats, and holds stormwater runoff. The trenches support tree health by providing space for roots and watering the trees with stormwater. Tree trenches are usually built beside sidewalks, like the Grella tree trench, but can also be built in center medians or plazas. Stormwater tree trenches support climate change adaptation by creating cooler, shaded and natural walkways for pedestrians and improving air quality, biodiversity, and storing carbon.​
Glendale School Rain Garden

Glendale School Rain Garden

Glendale Public School is in the Fletcher’s Creek SNAP​, where urbanization and stormwater runoff has impacted the health of Fletcher's Creek. Simultaneously, Glendale Public School needed to address property drainage issues. Due to the impacts of stormwater and property drainage issues, the school was selected as an ideal place for a rain garden. Led by Credit Valley Conservation, the rain garden was constructed on school grounds and provides stormwater quantity, quality, and erosion control. The rain garden supports the school, students and residents by creating a new green space, improving the environment, and helping keep Fletcher's Creek clean. The rain garden also provides learning opportunities for students and residents, improves resilience to climate change, and contributes to community pride.

​Contact​

Environment & Development Engineering
Public Works & Engineering
2 Wellington St W, Brampton​
905.874.2000

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