National Indigenous Peoples Day

Page Banner
Monday, June 21, 2021 to Monday, June 21, 2021
11:00 AM to 8:00 PM
Online

Brampton celebrates the heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding achievements of First Nations, Inuit and Métis each year on National Indigenous Peoples Day.​​​

The City of Brampton recognizes and acknowledges that our work takes place on the Treaty Territory of the Mississauga’s of the Credit First Nation, and before them, the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (hau-de-no-sau-nee), Huron and Wendat (Ou-en-dat).  We also acknowledge the many First Nations, Metis, Inuit and other global Indigenous people that now call Brampton home. We are honoured to live, work on and enjoy this land. 

This month is an opportunity to reflect on and learn about the heritage, diverse cultures, distinctive languages, and the spiritual beliefs of Indigenous peoples, as well as their exceptional contributions (past and present) that continue to enrich our community.

We commemorate those who have tragically been impacted or lost their lives through systemic injustices and mourn the loss of 215 children whose remains were discovered at the site of a residential school in Kamloops this year. We stand in solidarity with Indigenous Peoples and reinforce our commitment to reconciliation. 

The City of Brampton recognizes the importance and sacred nature of cultural ceremonies and celebrations. While due to COVID-19 celebrations and events are different this year, the City remains committed to celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day on Monday, June 21, in a virtual capacity, allowing us to recognize their experiences, consider their unique needs, listen, and amplify their voices and stories.

The programming for this event has been thoughtfully curated by Concierge Strategies​. We are grateful for their commitment to educating organizations on better reconciliation strategies, relationship building, and dedication to amplifying Indigenous culture.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
Opening Smudge, Prayer and Song

Indigenous Land Acknowledgement

City of Brampton National Indigenous Peoples Day Flag Raising

Strawberry Moon Teaching

Traditional Corn Soup Teaching

Basic Medicine Wheel Teaching

3 Sisters Teaching & Youth Activity

Indigenous Youth Drum & Song Performance

Metis History, Identity & Culture

The Creation Story, Interactive Youth Celebration Round Dance & Hoop Dance

Headlining Performance - Crown Lands


Activities

Opening Smudge, Prayer and Song

Wahmahtig (Learning Tree) - Hilton King, Helper Knowledge Keeper

Elder Wahmahtig opens National Indigenous Peoples Day 2021 with a smudge, prayer and song to celebrate the first peoples of Canada. Elder Wahmahtig humbly speaks to honour the strength and resilience of Indigenous Peoples.

Click here​ to launch video.

Indigenous Land Acknowledgement

Chief R. Stacey Laforme, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation

An Idigenous Land Acknowledgement is a formal statement that recognizes the relationship between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories. Acknowledging the land in an Indigenous practice that has been happening since time immemorial. It recognizes and respects the legal and spiritual relationship Indigenous Peoples have with their territories. ​

Click here​ to launch video.

City of Brampton National Indigenous Peoples Day Flag Raising

Mayor Patrick Brown and Councillor Jeff Bowman, City of Brampton

Watch Mayor Patrick Brown and Councillor Jeff Bowman offer remarks honouring this very important day and raising the flag of the Mississaugas of the First Credit.

Click here​ to launch video.​

Strawberry Moon Teaching

Tracey Whiteye, BSW., MSW., Oshkaabewis/Ogitchidaa kwe, Wholistic Practitioner, Educator, Researcher

The Strawberry Moon rises at the end of June. In Indigenous cultures strawberries are commonly referred to as the heart berry because of its shape of the heart. The strawberry is an important food and medicine in Indigenous cultures. It helps us understand the connection between mind, body, spirit and emotions. The heart berry also reminds us of reconciliation and teaches us how to maintain heartfelt relationships.​

Click here​ to launch video.

Traditional Corn Soup Teaching

Elder, Jaabaakwe - Joyce Tabobondung & Elder, Giibaadziqa - Dora Tabobondung

Elder Jaabaakwe and Elder Giibaadziqa share a history on the Indigenous process for curing hominy corn. The cured hominy corn is used to prepare traditional corn soup commonly served at Pow Wows, community events, and gatherings. This traditional corn soup teaching has been passed down from generation to generation between family and community.

Click here​ to launch video.

Basic Medicine Wheel Teaching

​Elder, Jaabaakwe, Joyce Tabobondung

Elder Jaabaakwe shares a history on the foundations of the medicine wheel teachings. The teachings of the medicine wheel encompass an Indigenous way of life, philosophically embracing all nations and races, since time immemorial.

Click here​ to launch video.

3 Sisters Teaching & Youth Activity

Chris Merkel, Indigenous Youth Consultant

Chris shares a traditional land based activity on the 3 Sisters; Corn, Squash and Beans. He also presents a youth activity on the 3 Sisters to incorporate the teachings into everyday life.

Click here​ to launch video.

Indigenous Youth Drum & Song Performance

Kiyana Johnston, Indigenous Youth Consultant

Kiana performs 3 songs to honour the Water, Missing and Murdered Indigenous, completing her performance with a round dance song.

The Water song is a sacred song and is first sung during a ceremony to honour the: water, self and community, acknowledging that water is necessary for our survival. The Water song is also sung to bring awareness to all Mother Earth and to honour the beautiful cycle of water.

Remember Me is to honour all missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and their journey to the spirit world and for ones still here on Mother Earth fighting for their justice.

Sunchild is a fun, unbeat round dance song. This song is a social song performed at Pow Wows and community gatherings intended to bring cheer and get people on their feet to celebrate Indigenous peoples culture and way of life.

Click here​ to launch video.​​

Métis History, Identity and Culture

Seán Kinsella (they/them/he/his) aayahkwew êkâ ê-akimiht nêhi(y/th)aw/otipemisiwak/Nakawé/Irish 

Director, the Eighth Fire, Place of Reconciliation for All Our Relations, Centennial College

Who are the Métis people and how do we move beyond surface levels of just understanding Métis people as "mixed"? Métis peoples are a distinct Nation with diverse languages, histories and cultural understandings about how they are related by kinship to other Indigenous Nations. In this short 15 minute video, you will hear more about the relationship of Métis people to the fur trade, some of the distinct markers of Métis cultural identity, as well as a little bit about Métis beadwork and sashes. 

Click here​ to launch video.​

The Creation Story, Interactive Youth Celebration Round Dance & Hoop Dance

​Monique Diabo, BA, PSCI, Womens Studies, Indigenous Studies

Monique shares traditional story-telling on the Creation Story, an interactive Youth celebration Round dance with her children and a beautiful hoop dance.

Click here​ to launch Youth introduction.

Click here to launch Creation Story part 1.

Click here to launch Creation Story part 2.

Click here​ to launch Hoop Dance.

Headlining Performance - Crown Lands

A virtual performance by powerhouse Canadian duo Crown lands —Kevin Comeau (guitar, bass, and keys) and Cody Bowles (vocals and drums)

Please visit Crown Lands​ website for more information!

Additional Information

​Click here​ for a list of Indigenous-owned businesses you can support.

Chief R. Stacey Laforme was elected in 1999. Chief Laforme was born and raised in Mississaugas of the Credit traditional territory. Not only is he a Chief, but also a notable storyteller and poet. He is best known for his poem, “Remember'' which is available on YouTube.

Chief Laforme is very active throughout Mississaugas of the Credit, empowering First Nations members residing on and off the First Nation. Mississaugas of the Credit encompasses 3.9 million acres of Southern Ontario.

Monique Diabo is of Mohawk and Taino descent, originally from the Mohawk community of Kahnawake, Quebec. Monique Diabo spent much of her life in the Plains Cree territory of Kehewin Cree Nation in Alberta.  Monique is an accomplished multi-disciplinary artist; actor, visual artist, singer, educator, dancer and choreographer. She recognizes the importance of imbedding Indigenous pedagogy into all facets of life; to continue the good work of closing gaps, removing barriers, supporting Indigenous culture, and building relationships with Indigenous and non-Indigenous folks to ensure spaces and services are inclusive and trauma informed.

​Contact​

Festival and Events Office
2 Wellington St W, Brampton​
905.874.2000

​​