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Brampton Emergency Management Article

Heat Warning


What to do during heat warnings

 
  • Keep cool
  • Stay hydrated
  • Check on your neighbours
 

When is a heat warning issued?

 

The Region of Peel Public Health issues Heat Warning when the forecasted daytime temperatures are expected to be at least 31°C, overnight temperatures are 20°C or above, and/or the humidex is at least 40°C. The duration of this event is two days. More information on alerts at: www.peelregion.ca/health/heat​

 

When is an extended heat warning issued?

 

The Region of Peel Public Health issues an Extended Heat Warning when the forecasted daytime temperatures are expected to be at least 31°C, overnight temperatures are 20°C or above, and/or the humidex is at least 40°C. The duration of this event is three + days.

 

Heat relief locations?

 

Heat Relief Locations are public-access municipal facilities, where residents can go to cool down and receive information related to heat safety. These locations are available across Brampton during heat events. The following facilities serve as Heat Relief Locations.

 

Municipal Facilities

 
  • Recreation Centres
  • Libraries
  • Civic Centre
  • City Hall
 

Be sure to check the City website for updates for changes/updates.

 

What are the signs and treatments for heat-related illness?

 

Sunburn:
Redness, pain, swelling of skin, blisters, fever and headaches
Treatment:
Leave water blisters intact to speed healing and avoid infection. If breaking of blister occurs, apply dry sterile dressing. Serious cases should be seen by a physician.

 

Heat cramps:
Heavy sweating can cause painful muscle spasms usually in the legs but possible in the abdomen.
Treatment:
Apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm, and give sips of water. If nausea occurs, discontinue sips of water. Move person to a cooler place to rest in a comfortable position. Observe the person carefully for changes in condition.

 

Heat exhaustion:
Heavy sweating, weakness, c​old, pale and clammy skin, weak pulse, fainting and vomiting, core temperature usually 38.8°C or higher, but normal temperature is possible.
Treatment:
Get the person out of the sun, move them to a cooler environment, lay them down and loosen clothing, apply cool wet cloths, give sips of water. If nausea occurs, discontinue sips of water; if vomiting continues, seek immediate medical attention.

 

Heatstroke:
Severe medical emergency, high body temperature (41°C or higher), hot, dry skin, rapid and strong pulse, incoherent speech, disoriented, confused, possible unconsciousness. TREATMENT: Call 9-1-1

 

If unable to get the person to medical help immediately, do the following:

 
  • Move person to a cooler environment
  • Remove outer clothing
  • Reduce body temperature using lukewarm (not cold) water to bathe/sponge the person
  • Do not give fluids
 

Did you know that during a heat warning or extended heat warning the City of Brampton activates a number of procedures to help its residents cope with the heat?

 

 

These include pools, splash pads and recreation centres relaxing loitering rules and extending hours of operation during the heat event.

 

 

Individuals are encouraged to restrict outdoor activity. It is also recommended that you stay out of the sun, drink lots of water and stay in air-conditioned places. Seniors and young children are particularly at risk, and residents are encouraged to check in on friends and family who they think may be vulnerable.

 

For more information on staying cool, visit www.brampton.ca​

What can you do to keep cool?

  • Stay indoors as much as possible
  • Limit your exposure to the sun
  • Avoid strenuous activities between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun is at its hottest
  • Spend the hottest part of the day in a cool or shaded area
  • Eat well-balanced, light and regular meals
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing their fluid intake
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages as they can increase your risk of dehydration
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight and light-coloured clothes that cover as much as possible
  • Protect your face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat
  • Never leave children or pets alone in a parked car
  • Check on your family, friends and neighbours, especially if they live alone
 

Heat warning tips in translated media​

 
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